Course Goals:

·          To give an overview of the major developments in modern architecture.

·         To place those developments into their historical contexts.

·         To investigate the changing ideas of the modern.

·         To introduce models for thinking critically about the built environment.

Course Texts:

·         Barry Bergdoll, European Architecture:  1750-1890 (Oxford:  Oxford University Press, 2000). ISBN:  0192842226

·         William J. R. Curtis, Modern Architecture Since 1900 (London:  Phaidon, 1996).  ISBN:  0714833568

·         Ulrich Conrads, Programs and Manifestoes on 20th-Century Architecture (Cambridge:  MIT Press, 1999).  ISBN:  0262530309

·         Other Readings available on the course website (http://angel.the-bac.edu)

Themes:

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

·         What is architecture?

·         What is the role of history in modern architecture?

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

·         What is the relationship between form and function, style and structure?

 

 

Sept. 8

Hour 1 - Introduction

Topics:

·         Course Introduction

·         Introduction to Themes

·         Review Syllabus

·         Reasons to Study Architecture

 

Readings:

·         NONE

Themes:

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

·         What is architecture?

·         What is the role of history in modern architecture?

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

·         What is the relationship between form and function, style and structure?


 


Hour 2 – Where does architecture fit?

Topics:

·         The modern in other fields

·         What does it mean to study the history of architecture?

·         Questions to ask

·         Issues to consider

Readings:

·         Charles Harrison, “Modernism,”  Critical Terms for Art History (web)

Themes:

·         What is architecture?

 

 

Hour 3 – Reasons for Revivals

Topics:

·         The Enlightenment

·         Laugier

·         Soufflot

·         Architecture parlante

Readings: 

·        Leonardo Benevolo, “Introduction,”  History of Modern Architecture (web)

Themes:

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

 

 

Sept. 15

Hour 1 - Neoclassicism

Topics:

·         Overview of International Neoclassicism

·         Differentiating between Greek and Roman Monuments

·         The Academy

·         The Grand Tour

Readings: 

·         Bergdoll 9-43

Themes:

·         What is the role of history in modern architecture?

 

 

Hour 2  - Neoclassicism and the City

Topics:

·         Neoclassical Architecture as a Symbol of the Power of Governments

·         Rationalization of the City

·         Place Royales

 

Readings: 

·         Bergdoll 43-71

·         C. M. Harris, “Washington’s Gamble, L’Enfant’s Dream:  Politics, Design, and the Founding of the National Capitol,” The William and Mary Quarterly (web)

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

·         What is architecture?

 

Hour 3 (DISCUSSION) – Neoclassicism in the New World

Topics:

·         What do US government buildings mean?

o        Boston State House

Readings: 

·        Michel Foucault, "Panopticism," Discipline and Punish (web)

·        Douglass Shand-Tucci, “Before and After Bulfinch,” Built in Boston:  City and Suburb 1800-2000 (web)

·        Harold and James Kirker, ”Charles Bulfinch:  Architect as Administrator” (web)

 

Themes:

·         What is the role of history in modern architecture?

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

 

Sept. 22

Grad Response 1 Due

Hour 1 – Gothic Revival

Topics:

·         The Medieval as a Source of the New

·         Pugin

·         Viollet-le-Duc

Readings: 

·         Bergdoll 139-170

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between form and function, style and structure?

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

 

Hour 2 – Romanesque Revival

Topics:

·         Hubsch

·         Richardson

Readings: 

·         Marcus Whiffen and Frederick Koeper, "Character and Reality," American Architecture, 1607-1976 (web)

 

Themes:

·         What is the role of history in modern architecture?

·         What is the relationship between form and function, style and structure?

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

 

Hour 3 (DISCUSSION)– The Picturesque & The Sublime

Topics:

·         Definitions of the Picturesque, the Sublime and the Beautiful

·         Footnotes:  Known Them, Love Them

 

Readings: 

·         Bergdoll 73-102

·         Edmund Burke, A Philosophical Enquiry into the Origin of Our Ideas of the Sublime and Beautiful, selections (web)

·         William Gilpin, “On Picturesque Beauty” (web)

Themes:

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

 

 

Sept. 29

Formal Analysis Due

Hour 1 –  Engineering:  Factories & Fairs

Topics:

·         Iron

·         Ecole Polytechnique

·         Bridges

·         World’s Fairs

·         Rise of Industrialization

·         Structural Innovations

Readings: 

·         Leonardo Benevolo, “Changes in Building Technique during the Industrial Revolution,” History of Modern Architecture (web)

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between form and function, style and structure?

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

 

Hour 2 – Haussmannization

Topics:

·         Remaking Paris

Readings: 

·         Bergdoll 241-267

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between form and function, style and structure?

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

 

Hour 3 (DISCUSSION) – Problems of Modern Life

Topics:

·         What is the experience of modernity?

o        Arcades

o        Gamble House

Readings: 

·         George Simmel, “The Metropolis and Modern Life” (web)

·         Walter Benjamin, Charles Baudelaire:  A Lyric Poet in the Era of High Capitalism, selections (web)

 

Themes:

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

 

Oct. 6

Hour 1 – EXAM #1 (No Discussion Today)

 

Hour 2 – Grids & Railroads

Topics:

·         The Rise of the Railroad

·         City Planning on the Grid

Readings: 

·         Andro Linklater, “The Immaculate Grid” and “The Shape of Cities,” Measuring America:  How an Untamed Wilderness Shaped the United States and Fulfilled the Promise of Democracy  (web)

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between form and function, style and structure?

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

 

Hour 3 – Skyscrapers & the Chicago School

Topics:

·         Steel Frame Construction

·         Sullivan

·         Burnham & Root

Readings: 

·         Curtis 33-51

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between form and function, style and structure?

 

Oct. 13

Hour 1 – The Arts & Crafts Movement

Topics:

·         Overview of Arts & Crafts

·         Morris

·         Ruskin

·         Mackintosh

Readings: 

·         Curtis 87-97

Themes:

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

·         What is architecture?

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

 

Hour 2– Frank Lloyd Wright & the Prairie Style

Topics:

·         Wright

·         Stick & Shingle Styles

Readings: 

·         Curtis 113-129

·         Conrads 25

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

·         What is the relationship between form and function, style and structure?

·         What is architecture?

 

Hour 3 (DISCUSSION)– Rise of the Suburb

Topics:

·         What is a suburb?  Are they good or bad?

o        Riverside, IL

 

Readings: 

·         Robert Fishman, “Introduction,” Bourgeois Utopias:  The Rise and Fall of Suburbia (web)

·         Kenneth Jackson, “The Main Line:  Elite Suburbs and Commuter Railroads” and “Time of the Trolley,” Crabgrass Frontier:  The Suburbanization of the United States (web)

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

·         What is the role of history in modern architecture?

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

 

Oct. 20

Thesis Statement & Research Plan Due

Hour 1 – The Garden City

Topics:

·         Howard

·         Garden Cities

·         Garden Suburbs

Readings: 

·         Curtis 241-255

·         Robert Fishman, "The Ideal City Made Practicable," "Inventing the Garden City," "Design for Cooperation," "The Peaceful Path," "Building the Garden City," "Elder Statesman," "Beyond the Grave," and "Summation," Urban Utopias in the Twentieth Century:  Ebenezer Howard, Frank Lloyd Wright, and Le Corbusier (web)

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

 

 

Hour 2 – City Beautiful

Topics:

·         Burnham

·         McKim, Mead & White

·         Plan of Chicago

·         Plan of Washington, DC

Readings: 

·         John W. Reps, "Chicago Fair and Capital City: the Rebirth of American Urban Planning," The Making of Urban America:  A History of City Planning in the United States (web)

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

·         What is the role of history in modern architecture?

 

 

Hour 3 (DISCUSSION)– Zoning & City Planning

Topics:

·         What are the rules for a city?

o        Equitable Building

Readings: 

·         Carol Willis, “Zoning and Zeitgeist:  The Skyscraper City in the 1920s” (Web)

·         Sally Kitt Chapell, “A Reconsideration of the Equitable Building in New York” (Web)

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

·         What is architecture?

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

 

Oct. 27

Grad Response #2 Due

Hour 1 – Art Nouveau & Concrete

Topics:

·         1900 World’s Fair

·         Perret

·         Tony  Garnier

 

Readings: 

·         Kenneth Frampton, “Tony Garnier and the Industrial City 1899-1918” and “Auguste Perret:  the Evolution of Classical Rationalism 1899-1925,”  Modern Architecture:  A Critical History (web)

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between form and function, style and structure?

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

 

Hour 2 – Influence of Arts & Crafts in Germany

Topics:

·         Werkbund

Readings: 

·         Curtis 99-111

·         Conrads 19-24, 26-31

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between form and function, style and structure?

 

Hour 3 (DISCUSSION) – Futurism

Topics:

·         What is the role of the new?

o        Italian Futurism

Readings:  

·         Curtis 109-111

·         Conrads 34-38

·         F. T. Marinetti et al, “The Foundation and Manifesto of Futurism” (web)

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

·         What is architecture?

·         What is the role of history in modern architecture?

 

Nov. 3

Hour 1 – Exam #2 (No Discussion Today)

 

Hour 2 – Introduction to the International Style

Topics:

·         Definitions of the International Style

·         De Stijl

Readings: 

·         Hitchcock and Johnson, “Introduction,” The International Style (web)

·         Curtis 257-273,

·         Conrads 39-40, 64-68, 78-80

Themes:

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

·         What is the relationship between form and function, style and structure?

·         What is architecture?

 

Hour 3 – Le Corbusier

Topics:

·         1925 Decorative Arts Fair

·         Villa Savoye

·         Voisin Plan

Readings: 

·         Curtis 275-285

·         Conrads 59-62, 89-94, 99-101

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

·         What is the role of history in modern architecture?

·         What is the relationship between form and function, style and structure?

 

Nov. 10

Paper Draft Due

Hour 1 – Gropius & the Bauhaus

Topics:

·         Gropius

·         Bauhaus Pedagogy

Readings: 

·         Curtis 183-199

·         Conrads 49-53, 95-97

Themes:

·         What is architecture?

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

·         What is the relationship between form and function, style and structure?

 

Hour 2 – Mies van der Rohe

Topics:

·         Barcelona Pavilion

·         Glass Towers

·         Transparent Architecture

Readings: 

·         Review 183-199

·         Conrads 74-75, 81-82, 102, 123

Themes:

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

·         What is the relationship between form and function, style and structure?

 

Hour 3 (DISCUSSION) – International Style Recap

Topics:

·         International Style:  Yeah or Ney

o        Tribune Competition

o        MoMA Show

Readings: 

·         Hitchcock and Johnson, “Introduction,” The International Style (web)

·         Curtis 217-227

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between form and function, style and structure?

 

Nov. 17

Grad Response #3 Due

Hour 1 – Alternative Versions of the International Style I:  Scandinavian Architecture

Topics:

·         Aalto

Readings: 

·         Curtis 329-349, 453-469

Themes:

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

 

Hour 2 – Alternative Versions of the International Style II:  Soviet Architecture

Topics:

·         Melnikov

·         Constructivism

·         Suprematism

Readings: 

·         Curtis 201-215

·         Conrads 56, 87-88

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

 

Hour 3 (DISCUSSION) – Conservative Architecture

Topics:

·         Is Modern Architecture always politically left-leaning?

o        Fascist Architecture

Readings: 

·         Curtis 351-369

·         S. Giedion, “The Need for a New Monumentality” (web)

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

·         What is the role of history in modern architecture?

 

Nov. 24

Hour 1 – Frank Lloyd Wright’s Late Style

Topics:

·         Falling Water

·         Broadacre City

Readings: 

·         Curtis 305-319

·         Conrads 124-5

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

 

Hour 2 – Late Le Corbusier

Topics:

·         The Unité

·         Expressive architecture

Readings: 

·         Curtis 319-327, 417-451

Themes:

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

 

Hour 3 – Slum Clearance & Public Housing

Topics:

·         Class and Architecture

·         Lincoln Center

·         Boston’s West End

Readings: 

·         Jane Jacobs, “Introduction,” The Death and Life of Great American Cities (web)

·         Conrads 109-113, 137-145

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

 

Dec. 1

Final Paper Due

Hour 1 – Gropius & Mies in America

Topics:

·         The Architects’ Collaborative

·         The Glass Tower

Readings: 

·         Curtis 395-415

·         Conrads 154

Themes:

·         What is the relationship between architecture (and planning) and politics?

 

Hour 2 – Monumentality

Topics:

·         Louis Kahn

·         Definitions of Monumentality and its problems

Readings: 

·         Curtis 513-527

·         Conrads 169-170

Themes:

·         What is architecture?

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

·         What is the role of history in modern architecture?

 

Hour 3 (DISCUSSION) – Post-Modernism & Review

Topics:

·         What comes after the modern?

·         Review

Readings: 

·         NONE

Themes:

·         What is the modern, modernity, modernism? And are they good or bad?

 

Dec. 8

Final Exam


THE FINE PRINT

About Me:

The Good:

I am consistently fascinated by the material covered in this course.  I will get excited during lectures and discussions, and I will often note that information is amazing, odd, perplexing, or even funny.  Do not mistake this for a lack of seriousness.    To truly engage with modern architecture on a deep level you must allow yourself to follow these ideas to their logical (or illogical) conclusions and question all of your assumptions.  This often means that one’s beliefs and expectations will be undermined.  I choose to find that experience amusing and intellectually exciting rather than disheartening, and I hope you will as well.

 

One of the most exciting things about teaching is being engaged with students as they work through ideas and learn different ways of thinking.  I want to hear what you have to say and I’m always available to talk.  Feel free (within reason) to ask for clarification during lectures, to bring up any questions you have in discussion, to email me (taralynnward@gmail.com), or set up an appointment to chat.   If you don’t get a response from me within 24 hours, email again.

 

I really want you to learn something in this class and I’m willing to invest time and energy into helping you do so.  I also value engagement, hard work, and improvement.  The TAs, the Writing Center, and I are all here to help you.  We will review drafts, give suggestions for study techniques, and answer your questions.  Don’t hesitate to make use of these resources. 

 

Perhaps it’s a bit extreme, but I’m obsessed with organization.  The syllabus, the lectures, the discussion sections, and the website are all the product of a lot of thought about how to present this material and how to help you learn.  Make a habit of reviewing this information as it is designed to show you how to succeed in this course.  You should also feel free to set up your own organizational systems, including taking notes on your laptop, taping lectures, and forming study groups.  If you have any questions or suggestions, let me know.

 

Time management is part of organization.  I have never missed, been late to, or been unprepared for a class I was teaching.  I’ll be here, class will start on time, and I’ll be ready.

 

The Bad:

I expect a lot of the same from you!

 

While this course does involve some memorization of facts, it’s not enough to know when something happened or what it looked like.  You need to think about why these things happened and how they relate to each other.  I will demand that you really engage with this material and attempt to synthesize and understand it.  Themes, theory, and interpretation will all be central to your success in this class.

 

 You will have to work in this class.  Some of the readings will be difficult.  Some of the ideas we cover will be complex.  Sometimes interpreting objects will be really hard.  I don’t expect you to immediately understand everything we will do in this class, but I do want you to be actively engaged in figuring it out.  Your comments in discussion, your exams, and your papers should all reflect serious thought and sustained work. 

 

I will give you two ten-minute breaks during each class to spend in any way you choose; however, during class time you should refrain from all of the following:  coming in late, phone calls, text messaging, email, web browsing, private conversations, and other work.

 

The TAs and I will remind you about assignments and exams, but WE WILL NOT ACCEPT LATE PAPERS OR GIVE MAKE-UP EXAMS.  (See below for the exception to this rule.)  Mark your calendars and plan your time.

 

Showing up is only half the battle (literally).  50% of your participation grade will be based on attendance, which will be taken in discussion section.  (That means you will immediately lose 5 participation points or ½ a point on your final grade every time you miss discussion.)  The other half of the participation grade is based on your contributions to discussion.  You should always read the discussion readings in advance and come prepared either to explain the ideas therein to your colleagues or to ask specific questions about the material.  Be forewarned:  material covered in discussion will appear on exams.

 

The Ugly:

As someone who works hard to both understand what has been said about this material and to come up with original interpretations, I take plagiarism as a personal offense.  ANY ATTEMPT TO PRESENT SOMEONE ELSE’S WORK AS YOUR OWN WILL RESULT IN PUNISHMENT.

 

Here are the possible penalties:

o        Unintentional Plagiarism (improper citation or lack of attribution): 

§         Repeated Issues within a single assignment:  a deduction of at least 10 points and a warning

§         Repeated issues over multiple assignments will be viewed as intentional plagiarism (see below).

§         This means that you will need to learn how to cite your sources using footnotes.  Information about how to do so is available on the course website and we will have a tutorial on footnotes in discussion section before the first written assignment is due.

o        Intentional Plagiarism (copying part or all of a paper and/or cheating on an exam): 

§         First Offense:  0 for the assignment

§         Second Offense:  Formal complaint to the BAC’s disciplinary committee

 

The TAs and I make a habit of checking the assignments we receive for plagiarism, we look for cheating during exams, and these penalties are non-negotiable.

 

About You (Undergrad):

As an undergrad your goals for this course should be as follows:

1.       To master college-level academic skills including:

a.       Critical Reading:  the ability to summarize the main points of an argument and formulate questions about it.

b.      Study Skills:  being well prepared for exams and organizing information.

c.       Academic Writing:  formulating a clear argument and providing various forms of proof for it.

2.       To familiarize yourself with important examples of modern architecture and design as well as their historical context.

3.       To begin to think about various methods of interpreting architecture.

 

Your grade will be calculated in the following way:

Participation – 10%

Formal Analysis (Sept. 29) – 5%

Exam #1 (Oct. 6) – 15%

Thesis Statement (Oct. 20) – 5%

Exam #2 (Nov. 3) – 15%

Draft (Nov. 10) – 10%

Final Paper (Dec. 1) – 20%

Exam #3 (Dec. 8) – 20%

 

For information about individual assignments, see the website.

 

About You (Grad):

As a grad student your goals for this course should be as follows:

1.       To ensure that you have mastered all undergrad-level skills.

2.       To improve your academic skills by

a.       Moving towards sustained and in-depth criticism of texts and the ability to explain a network of connections between texts,

b.      Developing a writing style and distinct position or methodology for your written arguments.

3.       To think about your own relationship to modern architecture and theory.

4.       To prepare yourself to explain your interpretations and ideas to the public.

 

Your grade will be calculated in the following way:

Participation – 10%

Response #1 (Sept. 22) – 5%

Formal Analysis (Sept. 29) – 5%

Exam #1 (Oct.6) – 10%

Thesis Statement (Oct. 20) – 5%

Response #2 (Oct. 27) – 5%

Exam #2 (Nov. 3) – 10%

Draft (Nov. 10) – 10%

Response #3 (Nov. 17) – 5%

Final Paper (Dec. 1) – 20%

Exam #3 (Dec. 8) – 15%

 

Graduate students will be required to write three two-to-three-page response papers in which you relate some aspect of this class to your own work or current architectural practice.  A selection of these papers will be uploaded to the website in order to foster conversation.  For more information, see the website.

 

The “Get Out of Jail Free” Card:

I realize that life often interferes with even the best plans and I appreciate that we often find ourselves having taken on more than we can handle; however, it’s been my experience that individually negotiating extensions and revising expectations is more often than not detrimental to everyone involved.  Thus this semester I am instituting a new “Get Out of Jail Free” policy.

 

Attached to this syllabus is a card that entitles you to one and only one of the following:

  • A one-week extension on one written assignment,
  • One take-home make-up exam to be completed within one week of the original exam,
  • 5 points added to your final grade.

 

To “play the card” email me on or before the due date or exam day.  You must email me or you will receive a 0 for the missed assignment.  If you do not play the card, the 5 points will be automatically added to your final grade.

 

All other requests for extensions or other allowances will be referred to student advising.

 

FAQs:

What’s the deal with all this reading and where do I get the textbooks?

o        The lectures and the readings are complementary, but do not duplicate each other. 

§         The Bergdoll text (Barry Bergdoll, European Architecture:  1750-1890 (Oxford:  Oxford University Press, 2000). ISBN:  0192842226) and the Curtis text (William J. R. Curtis, Modern Architecture Since 1900 (London:  Phaidon, 1996).  ISBN:  0714833568) are both survey textbooks to give you background and discussions of individual projects.

§         Both the Bergdoll and the Curtis are excellent references, so I highly suggest that you purchase them.  They are both available new and used online (for example at amazon.com).

·         Since I realize delivery takes a fixed amount of time, I will put scans of all of the readings for the first two meetings on the website.

·         However, if you don’t want to purchase the books, I’ve placed them on reserve at the BAC library and they are widely available in other libraries in the area.

o        Readings listed under the discussion section will be the addressed in class.

§         Please bring these readings with you to class so that you can refer to them during discussion.

§         You should also be ready to have a conversation about them.  In order to prepare for that I suggest you read the texts, then try to summarize them and/or make a list of questions and issues they raise.

o        The Conrads book (Ulrich Conrads, Programs and Manifestoes on 20th-Century Architecture (Cambridge:  MIT Press, 1999).  ISBN:  0262530309) contains primary source readings that will be used both for discussion and as background to lecture.

o        A number of the readings listed on the syllabus are not from the course textbooks.  They are available as PDFs on the course website.

 

How do I know what section to attend?

I will email the section assignments and post them on the website before the second class meeting.

 

What’s on the website?

o        The course website is located at angel.the-bac.edu

o        Features of the website:

§         The website contains all of the readings not in the course textbooks.  They are organized by date under the Lessons tab.

§         A slide list for each of the lectures will also be in the same folder.  (You might consider printing it out before class.)

§         There is also a course calendar to remind you of upcoming deadlines.

§         All assignments as well as the syllabus are posted on the website.

§         As are a series of files with hints and suggestions for the assignments.

§         A file containing review images—the projects for which you’ll be responsible—for each exam is also available on the site.

§         There are also reviews for each of the exams.

§         On occasion I will post announcements on the site as well so be sure to check the site regularly.

 

What do I do if I have a problem with the website?

o        In order to assess the site you will need to use your BAC login and password.

o        If you have problems getting onto the site, contact Media Services at 617 585-0185 or media.services@the-bac.edu.

o        If you have problems with specific files, email me (taralynnward@gmail.com).

 

How do I turn in assignments?

o        In order to save paper and time, please submit your assignments electronically.  There are two ways to do so:

§         Email the file (preferably in Word, although a PDF is also acceptable) to your section leader.

§         Upload the file to your section leader’s drop box on the Angel website.

 

How do I contact the course staff and how will they contact me?

o        The best way to contact me is via email (taralynnward@gmail.com). 

§         I check my email very regularly so if you don’t receive a response from me within 24 hours, email me again.

o        I am happy to meet with students (whether they are in my discussion section or not).  Just email me to set up a time.

o        Your section leader will give you his or her contact information during your first meeting.

o        Since we only meet once a week it is imperative that both your section leader and I have a valid email address through which we can contact you.  Please be sure to update your contact information on Angel and to list an email address that you check on the sign in sheet.